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It's A Dog's Life - YOUR Dog's! Newsletter, Issue #024 - Injured dog
March 15, 2008
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Save your dog's life with dog first aid!

Whether you're new to dog ownership, or a long-time friend; have a puppy, or care for a senior dog; own a purebred, or a cross from the rescue center; regardless of your situation, your dog is precious to you.

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Issue 24

Table of Contents

5 Tips when dealing with an injured dog




Injured dog

Many traffic accidents involving dogs, both minor and severe, could have been prevented with proper obedience training. Be sure that your dog is well trained and always under the control of a reasonable person when he is being walked outside, especially when being walked near a busy road.

If for some reason an accident does occur and your dog gets hit by a car, do not panic. Keep your emotions in check and use common sense. Your dog is still very much at risk for further injury, so be extremely careful when moving him out of further danger.

Warning: A dog that is badly injured may bite you if he is in shock or severe pain. This holds true even if he belongs to you and knows you. So before assessing the dog's injuries, use a scarf or other piece of clothing to muzzle him. A rope or a tie will do just fine here as well. Examine the dog's face and body for injury and get immediate medical attention.

Moving An Injured Dog

Regardless if the dog is conscience or unconscious, it must be moved to a safe place. Have someone watch out and block further traffic while you adhere to the following six tips:

1. Before attempting to move the dog out of the risk of traffic, check over the his body for obvious wounds, cuts, and distorted limbs,

2. With the help of another person, carefully drag and then lift the dog's body onto a blanket or a coat if you have one. Pull the blanket or coat out of harms way. Avoid rubbing any obvious injuries.

3. It is important to keep the dog muzzled if he is experiencing obvious shock or pain. Be sure to securely tie the muzzle so as to prevent an accidental bite.

4. Gently feel every limb for broken or dislocated bones. And if you suspect a fractured limb, then move it as little as possible. Also, a dog with potential spinal injuries should be lifted on a flat board.

5. Some dogs whom have been injured in car accidents appear to be normal. But beware, he may have damage to internal organs. He will need immediate medical attention. Once the dog has been removed for further risk in traffic, examine it thoroughly and take him to the nearest vet.


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