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It's A Dog's Life - YOUR Dog's! Newsletter
April 15, 2011
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Save your dog's life with dog first aid!

Whether you're new to dog ownership, or a long-time friend; have a puppy, or care for a senior dog; own a purebred, or a cross from the rescue center; regardless of your situation, your dog is precious to you.

You want only the best for your dog, just like you want the best for every member of your family. This newsletter has the Dog Information and resources you need to give your dog the best -- the best of health, the best of safety, the best of lifelong well being.

With some prevention and some planning, you can keep your dog healthy and safe, for years to come.

If you find this newsletter useful, please do a friend and us a big favor and "pay it forward." Forward this issue to all the dog lovers you know. Dogs everywhere will thank you for it!

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Table of Contents

Dog House Training or House Training a Dog.


House training your dog is one of the areas of dog ownership that's most subject to misunderstanding, confusion, and some people just plain dread!

This months newsletter is going to deal with two of the most common problems surrounding the issue of house training:

- Submissive/excited urination and Scent marking

Common house training problem #1: Submissive / excited urination

What is it?

A submissive urinator is a dog that urinates on the floor and himself (and sometimes on you and any guests you may have!) in situations of extreme excitement or stress - like when you return home at the end of the day.

Why does it happen?

Puppies are the usual candidates for submissive/excited urination, but it's not uncommon to see adult dogs with the problem as well: usually, these are highly sensitive and timid dogs, and/or ones from a shelter/with a history of abuse (often these last two go hand-in-hand.)

When does it happen?

Situations when an excited/fearful dog is likely to urinate: - Greeting time after a prolonged absence - Play time - The arrival of guests - Stressful situations at home, eg arguments - During a correction - Sudden loud noises (thunder, fireworks)

What can I do about it?

First of all, you should take him to the vet to make sure there's no medical reason for the issue (like diabetes or a bladder infection.)

Next, it's time to take control of the problem:

- Limit his intake of water to help him control his bladder more effectively. For example, you have guests coming over, or are planning on a play session soon take his water bowl away for a period of time (maybe half an hour to an hour) before the event.

- When greeting your dog, keep it calm and mellow. The more excited he is, the harder it is for him to control his bladder.

- It's important that you DO NOT punish or harshly correct your dog for this behavior. It's not something that he can easily control, and he's certainly not doing it on purpose.

- If he urinates out of fear (submissiveness) when scolding him for another offense, try to take the stress levels down a notch by keeping a firm, authoritative, but not angry tone.

Common house training problem #2: Scent marking

Scent marking - where a dog "marks" his or her territory with urine it is technically not actually a house training problem, since it's based on issues of dominance and territoriality rather than insufficient house training (a dog can be perfectly house trained but still mark inside the house.)

Scent marking and lack of house training: how to differentiate between the two

Your dog's probably scent marking, rather than genuinely relieving himself, if:

- The amount of urine produced is relatively small, and tends to be directed against vertical surfaces (walls, doors, etc)

- He's male, unneutered, and at least five or six months old. Unneutered dogs are much more territorial than neutered ones if you have an unneutered dog in the house, you can pretty much expect a certain amount of scent marking. (Unspayed females also mark, but it's less common; spayed and neutered dogs can also exhibit marking behavior, but it's relatively infrequent)

- It makes little difference how often he's taken outside for a toilet break

- He frequently targets items that are new to the house: new possessions, guest clothing/footwear, etc

What to do about the problem?

First things first: spay or neuter your dog(s) as soon as you possibly can. If you can do this early enough ideally, at six months of age - this often halts marking altogether; but if your dog's been marking for a prolonged period of time, he or she may continue to do so after being spayed or neutered, since a pattern of behavior will have been established.

Clean soiled areas thoroughly. Use a non-ammonia based cleaner (because it smells just like pee) and stay away from vinegar too (it smells similar to pee.) Oxi-Clean mixed with warm water is particularly effective; there are also plenty of commercial cleaners designed specifically to lift pet stains and odors, which you can buy from pet stores and some supermarkets.

Because dogs tend to re-mark the same places, you'll need to redefine the places that you know he's marked to prevent repeat offending.

You can do this in a number of ways:

- Feed him next to or on top of the spot - Play with him there - Groom him there - Put his bed over or next to it - Spend time there yourself: hang out with a book or sit down and work

For more information on how to successfully house train your dog (as well as a whole bunch of in-depth information on house training troubleshooting and related issues) you'll probably want to check out The Ultimate House Training Guide site by clicking this link!

It's A Dog's Life - YOUR Dog's!


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Tips to Save YOU money...

1. Trimming your dog's nails and grooming his or her fur at home saves money spent on professional groomers.

2. Practice good dental hygiene. Daily brushing of your dog's teeth has significant returns.

3. Don't skip vaccinations or flea and tick prevention . Vaccines protect pets from painful and tragic diseases such as rabies, and fleas and ticks carry harmful diseases such as the plague that may also be spread to people in contact with pets.

4. Buy fewer toys , and trick pets into thinking those toys are new, time and time again.

5. Be creative with ways to make toys more interactive. Consider buying Buster Cubes or Kong toys for dogs to give them more stimulation while they eat or enjoy treats.

I hope these tips help your budget and most importantly the health and happiness of your dog.

One additional tip on the list is to consider pet insurance. It is one that I firmly believe in as well. For those on a budget, it can really allow you to do the best for your dog when you need it most.

Pet insurance dramatically reduces the costs of large veterinary bills, ranging from emergency care after an accident and cancer treatment to preventative check-ups and care including vaccinations.

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Wouldn't You Rather Learn How to Deal with Minor Dog Health Problems BEFORE they Become Major Ones?

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